Do-Gooders Won’t Take “No” For An Answer

By Tom Engellenner

About a month ago we posted an article on the dismissal of Consumer Watchdog’s appeal at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit following a loss at the USPTO in an inter partes reexamination. Consumer Watchdog, Inc. had petitioned the U.S. Patent Office to review a stem cell patent owned by the Wisconsin Alumnae Research Foundation (WARF). A reexamination was conducted but the patent survived the challenge. Consumer Watchdog then appealed the government’s refusal to invalidate the WARF patent.

In Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, 753 F.3d 1258  (Fed. Cir. 2014), a three-judge panel of the CAFC found that a non-profit entity “dedicated to providing an effective voice for taxpayers and consumers” lacked standing to appeal to an Article III Court despite the statute’s general statement of a right to appeal. In the panel decision, written by Judge Rader, the court found that Consumer Watchdog, Inc., simply had “not identified a particularized, concrete interest in the patentability of the [patent at issue], or any injury in fact flowing from the Board’s decision.”

Well . . . unwilling to go quietly into the night . . . Consumer Watchdog has now petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for certiorari review of the Federal Circuit decision. The Petition asserts that the Federal Circuit’s decision had failed to take into account cases concerning the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the Federal Election Campaign Act, where the Supreme Court has upheld laws giving third parties standing to appeal agency actions. Continue reading “Do-Gooders Won’t Take “No” For An Answer”