AIA On-Sale Bar Applies to Publicized Sales, Even When Knowledge of Sale Did Not Disclose the Underlying Invention

By Reza Mollaaghababa
The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) recently construed the on-sale bar provision of 35 U.S.C. 102(a) in a way that will make it easier for petitioners to challenge third party patents. While in an inter-partes review proceeding, a petitioner can rely only on prior art patents and printed publications to challenge the validity of one or more claims of a third-party patent, in a post-grant review proceeding, a petitioner can raise any statutory ground of invalidity including the on-sale bar provision of 35 U.S.C. 102(a).  This statutory provision, as modified by America Invents Act (AIA), bars patenting a claimed invention if the “claimed invention was patented, described in a printed publication, or in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed inventions.”

Prior to the enactment of AIA, it was well established that the sale of a claimed invention more than one year from the effective filing date of a patent application, even if the sale did not involve disclosing the underlying invention, would bar patenting the invention. However, the change in the wording of this statutory provision introduced by AIA, and particularly, the use of the phrase “otherwise available to the public” immediately following “on sale” created ambiguity about whether a sale of a claimed invention without disclosing the underlying invention would trigger the on-sale bar provision.

Recently, in the case of Helsinn Healthcare S.A. v. Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc., the CAFC cleared up this ambiguity and held that the on-sale bar provision of 35 USC 102(a) applies to the sale of a claimed invention even if the sale did not involve disclosing the underlying invention.  This decision can provide yet another tool for challenging patents in a post-grant proceeding.    Continue reading “AIA On-Sale Bar Applies to Publicized Sales, Even When Knowledge of Sale Did Not Disclose the Underlying Invention”