Supreme Court Holds That AIA On-Sale Bar Applied to Secret Sales

By Reza Mollaaghababa
In an inter-partes review proceeding (IPR), a challenger can rely only on patents and printed publications to challenge the validity of a patent claim. In contrast, in a post grant review (PGR) proceeding, a challenger can rely on any ground related to patentability, including prior sale, to challenge a patent claim.  In particular, 35 U.S.C. §102(a)(1) bars a person from receiving a patent on an invention that was “in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed invention.” Continue reading “Supreme Court Holds That AIA On-Sale Bar Applied to Secret Sales”

If at First You Don’t Succeed: File, File And File Again

By Tom Engellenner
Petitioners seeking to invalidate patents via the new AIA inter partes review (“IPR”) proceedings at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) appear to be increasingly willing to file multiple petitions against the same patent. In several instances, the same petitioner has filed three, four or even five petitions against a single patent. An explanation for this tactic may lie in the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) practice of culling the grounds that will be considered when an IPR is initiated by invoking its vertical or horizontal redundancy rules. (For our prior articles on the PTAB redundancy rules, click here and here.) However, this phenomenon may also reflect the formidable “fire-power” that can be mustered by some challengers (often multinational corporations) against patent owners.

For example, in December 2013, Subaru (together with a host of other car manufacturers) filed five IPRs against U.S. Patent No. 6,324,463 (relating to cruise control indicators). In October 2013, Apple filed four IPR petitions against U.S. Patent No. 7,010,536 (relating to multi-user networking systems). Similarly, Microsoft filed four IPR petitions in May 2013 against U.S. Patent No. 6,724,403 (relating to graphical user interfaces). By asserting different grounds in separate petitions, these challengers were apparently trying to minimize the likelihood of dismissal of any of their asserted grounds for invalidity based on redundancy.

Continue reading “If at First You Don’t Succeed: File, File And File Again”