Stanford Patent Found Invalid in IPR proceedings but Licensee’s IP Survives

By Tom Engellenner
In a decision this month (IPR2013-00308), the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) has ruled against Stanford University’s patented method for detecting Down’s syndrome and other chromosomal defects, finding all of the challenged claims 1-13 invalid. The Stanford patent, U.S. Patent Number 8,296,076, is licensed to Verinata Health Inc., and is the subject of patent infringement litigation initiated by Verinata and Stanford against Ariosa Diagnostics in 2012 (Verinata Health Inc. et al. v. Ariosa Diagnostics Inc. et al., case no. 3:12-cv-05501, N.D. California). (Verinata is now owned by genetic instruments maker, Illumina, which acquired it in 2013 for over $350 million dollars.) The remaining two claims of US Patent 8,296,076, independent claim 14 and its dependent claim 15 directed to a “method of testing for an abnormal distribution of chromosome in a sample comprising a mixture of maternal and fetal DNA,” were not challenged in the IPR2013-00308.

In two other recent decisions in October, 2014, Verinata’s own IP survived challenges by Ariosa. In final decisions on IPR 2013-00276 and IPR2013-00277, the PTAB decided that Ariosa had failed to meet its burden of showing by a preponderance of evidence that the claims of U.S. Patent Number 8,318,430 were invalid, representing a rare outcome where all of the challenged claims in a IPR proceeding were successfully defended. The Verinata ‘430 patent is the subject of separate pending litigation in the Northern District of California between Verinata and Ariosa (Illumina, Inc. v. Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc., case no. 3:14-cv-01921, N.D. California). Continue reading “Stanford Patent Found Invalid in IPR proceedings but Licensee’s IP Survives”